Dr Jack Roberts: Lost in the ether: missing perspectives within anaesthesia | Association of Anaesthetists
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Dr Jack Roberts: Lost in the ether: missing perspectives within anaesthesia

Dr Jack Roberts: Lost in the ether: missing perspectives within anaesthesia

Dr Jack Roberts

Dr Jack Roberts is a registrar anaesthetist in training (ST4) at the Royal Sussex County Hospital which is in Brighton and that's part of the KSS [Kent, Surrey and Sussex] Deanery. He identifies as a gay man. Growing up as a gay person was associated with secrecy and shame, and it was not until university that he felt able to have a life that was more authentic. As a student and later a trainee in healthcare settings, he was aware of derogatory comments about the LGBT community and found that the theatre environment can be a breeding ground for ‘toxic masculinity’. However, on the whole he feels that the LGBT+ is a fantastic community with a wealth of support.

You can listen to the audio recording or read the transcription of the interview.


Summary

Time code (approximately)
Point of interest
00:02:20
Dr Roberts talks about becoming aware of his sexual identity as a child and a teenager.
00:03:51 How that affected him and how it influenced his attitude towards learning, "I think it affects just the way you behave, the constant need to seek validation for who you are.”
00:06:17
His decision to go into medicine.
00:08:52
His experience of university (Imperial College, London).
00:09:09
Being open about being gay as a student.
00:12:01
Becoming interested in anaesthesia.
00:13:41
His foundation training with the South Thames Deanery.
00:14:09
His feelings of being overwhelmed and unsupported during training.
00:18:36
More positive feelings about starting in his current role "It was such a breath of fresh air. It was such a supportive environment.”
00:19:30
The pros and cons of being open about sexual identity in the workplace and his decision to be open.
00:20:07
Having to come out "hundreds of times.”
00:22:01
Being advised by a mentor to hide his sexual identity, but deciding to be open nevertheless, "I think it's a sense of authenticity, being able to go to work who you are, and what people see is what they get.”
00:22:15
His elective training in Australia.
00:27:28
The differences between hospitals in UK and Australia.
00:29:34
The masculine environment of the operating theatre "There's a lot of interesting egos in the operating department and some really toxic energy.”
00:31:20 Support available in instances of discrimination.
00:32:02
The attitude of some colleagues towards LGBTQ+ people.
00:35:19
Wearing the NHS Rainbow Badge.
00:40:08
LGBTQ+ support networks.
00:41:06
His role models, Dr Helgi Johansson.
00:44:47
What he enjoys most about his role.
00:47:25
The highlights of his career so far (Royal Flying Doctor Service in Australia).
00:48:48
The worst moment of his career.
00:53:02
His possible career break or change of career direction.
00:54:34
His advice to young people aiming for a career in medicine.
00:55:39
His advice to young LGBTQ+ people interested in becoming anaesthetists.
00:57:12
His memories of a radiologist trying to put him off medicine when he was sixteen.
00:59:35
Looking forward to receiving his FRCA certificate.