The Hypodermic Syringe, Morphine Addiction and Nineteenth-Century France | Association of Anaesthetists
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The Hypodermic Syringe, Morphine Addiction and Nineteenth-Century France

The Hypodermic Syringe, Morphine Addiction and Nineteenth-Century France

Thursday 2 December 2021, 18:00-19:00

Audience: 16+

Morphine addictions increased significantly following the invention of the hypodermic syringe in 1851. Whilst generally attributed to Alexander Wood (Edinburgh), French newspapers labelled Charles Pravaz of Lyon as the ‘true inventor of the syringe’. Many French artists created works showing morphine use and syringes. By investigating these images, this talk explores how artists reinforced an unavoidable association between women, addiction and the medical sector.

Dr Hannah Halliwell is the Teaching Fellow in Art History at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts. Hannah’s specialisms are in French art and Visual Culture, 1850-1914, with a particular interest in representations of the female body, intersections between art and medicine and the art market in Paris.

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Fees
Members and non-members: £5.00
Medical student: £3.75
Early bird and last minute booking rates apply (see event page for details).
Early bird code (first 20 bookings): F2B004